Jan 31, 2014

Posted by in Personal Shopper | 0 Comments

Retail treatment for depression

The results of the investigation of a group of researchers from the University of Michigan may not be good for your wallet but as support themselves show how you can feel better emptying your bank account! According to American researchers retail therapy, beyond surface, can be highly effective in terms of reducing the feeling of unhappiness that someone feels. Indeed, as experts stress may even make someone feel that he has more control in the environment that moves. Generations on generations of consumers are encouraged to meet the desire to keep up with the latest fashion, the so called window shopping.

Shopping

Shopping

But according to researchers from Michigan, no one should ignore the importance of retail therapy, as it helps people to overcome the feeling of melancholy. The team of researchers conducted three experiments to determine whether the shopping could restore the sense of control people in order to be able to combat feelings of sadness. They concluded that the shopping was 40 times more effective in providing this sense of control the situation, making them three times happier than those who borrowed something. Previous studies, says a report in the British newspaper Daily Mail, had shown that consumers enjoyed more positive emotions when looking at something that had just acquired shop having as motivation the desire to make their mood. However, the researchers point out that it remains unclear whether the shopping bring psychological benefits, beyond those produced when a distracted, or with the passage of time.

Shopping

Shopping

The research indicates that when shopping one can restore a sense of personal control over a situation, and to reduce the feeling of unhappiness. The retail therapy, meaning shopping motivated to address a negative emotion, once considered as inefficient, wasteful and dark side of the behavior of a consumer. We note that it may prove to be a very effective way to overcome one’s melancholy, the researchers concluded.

By Nicole P.

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